Further research with interviews probes was required to understand this seeking

Further research with interviews probes was required to understand this seeking

5%–7% in the last step. The model was acceptable as illustrated by the nonsignificant X 2 fit indices at the bottom of Table 5, similar to results in previous beetalk studies. 30–32 Compared with workers with high education (n=297), employees with low educational background (n=333) were 1.8 times more likely to have employer–employee relationship problems (B=0.597, p<0.01; OR=1.817, 95% CI=1.318–2.506, Table 5). Similarly, employees with a middle education (n=183) had also high odds ratios for having employer–employee relationship problems compared with peers with high education, n=297 (B=0.540, p<0.01; OR=1.717, 95% CI=1.178–2.501). In addition, workers with children in the family (n=550) were found to have a high likelihood of possessing employer–employee relationship problems compared with their counterparts without children, n=263 (B=0.320, p<0.05; OR=1.377, 95% CI=1.021–1.857). However, evidence in Table 5 revealed that employees in Tutong district (n=103) were far less likely to have employer–employee relationship problems compared with colleagues in Temburong district, n=9 (B=?0.737, p<0.01; OR=0.479, 95% CI=0.299–0.766).

Notes: 1 Low education = Primary school to General Certificate of Education Advanced Level (GCE A-Level). 2 Middle education = Post-secondary to Higher National Diploma (HND). 3 Bomo = traditional healer. *p<0.05 (two-tailed). **p<0.01 (two-tailed).